2021 was a great year for astronomy enthusiasts. We witnessed four supermoons, the century’s longest partial lunar eclipse, an unexpected comet visible with naked eyes, and the triple conjunction of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn. And to top it all, the year ended with the James Webb Space Telescope launch. So what does 2022 have in store for us? As it turns out, a lot! Here’s the astronomy calendar of 2022.

Astronomy Calendar 2022

January

January 3: Earth at perihelion
The Earth’s annual orbit will take it to the closest point around the Sun. On January 2, the Earth will be 0.98 AU from the Sun. That’s about 300,000 km closer than average. Note that this event has hardly anything to do with the local weather.

January 4: Quadrantid meteor shower
The first meteor shower of 2021 will reach its peak activity on the night of January 4. Like the Perseids (August) and the Geminids (December), it is one of the year’s strongest showers. First seen in 1825, the Quadrantids can produce up to 120 meteors per hour and are best viewed from the Northern Hemisphere under clear skies.

Astronomy Calendar 2022

January 17: 2022’s first Full Moon
The January Full Moon is also called the Wolf Moon.

February

February 4: Saturn at solar conjunction
Saturn will pass behind the Sun as seen from the Earth and remain hidden for a few weeks.

February 4: Venus at greatest brightness
Venus will reach its greatest brightness in its 2022 morning apparition, at mag -4.6. for a few weeks. Look for the planet in the east shining brightly with Mercury and Mars.

February 27: Moon, Mars, and Venus
The Moon will pass very close to Mars and Venus in the dawn sky.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Stellarium Web

March

March 5: Jupiter at solar conjunction
Venus will reach its greatest brightness in its 2022 morning apparition, at mag -4.6. for a few weeks. Look for the planet in the east shining brightly with Mercury and Mars.

March 14: ɣ-Normid meteor shower
The only meteor shower in March: Up to 6 meteors per hour.

March 20: The Spring Equinox
Equal duration of day and night on Earth; the Sun will shine directly over the equator. It’s the first day of spring in the north and fall in the south.

March 28: Moon, Venus, Mars, and Saturn
The Moon will pass close to Venus, Mars, and Saturn in the dawn sky in the southeast.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Stellarium Web

April

April 4: Conjunction of Saturn and Mars
Saturn will pass just 0°19′ to the north of Mars. Look for them in the southeast at dawn.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Stellarium Web

April 12: Conjunction of Jupiter and Neptune
The only meteor shower in March: Up to 6 meteors per hour.

April 22: Lyrid meteor shower
The best meteor shower in April: up to 18 meteors per hour.

April 30: Partial Solar Eclipse
The year’s first eclipse; visible from parts of South America and Antarctica.

May

May 6: η-Aquariid Meteor Shower 
Fireballs from Halley’s comet: up to 40 meteors per hour in the pre-dawn sky.

May 16: Total Lunar Eclipse
The first lunar eclipse of 2022; visible from Africa, the Americas, Europe, and French Polynesia.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Dominic Ford, in-the-sky.org

May 26: Lunar occultation of Venus
The Moon will pass in front of Venus, temporarily hiding it from the view seen in some parts of the world. For the rest of the world, the two celestial bodies will appear too close to each other.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Dominic Ford, in-the-sky.org

May 28: Conjunction of Jupiter and Mars 
The two will pass within 0°38′ of each other. Look for them in the southeast in the pre-dawn sky.

Astronomy Calendar 2022
Image: Stellarium Web

June

June 4: Saturn Enters Retrograde Motion
Saturn will halt its usual eastward movement through the constellations and turn to move westwards.

June 14: Super Strawberry Moon
The first supermoon of the year: The June Full Moon is also called the Strawberry Moon.

June 21: The Summer Solstice
The Sun will shine directly over the Tropic of Cancer for the first time of the year. It’s the first day of summers in the north and winters in the south.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 1

June 27: Neptune Enters Retrograde Motion 
Neptune will halt its usual eastward movement through the constellations and turn to move westwards.

July

July 4: Earth at Aphelion
The Earth will reach its farthest point from the Sun, about 3 million km further away than average.

July 21: Lunar occultation of Mars and Uranus
Moon will pass in front of Mars and Uranus on the same day in a rare astronomical event.

July 29-30: δ-Aquariid Meteor Shower
Up to 25 meteors per hour: Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

You may also like

August

August 12: Super Sturgeon Moon
The third and the final supermoon of 2022: The August Full Moon is also called the Sturgeon Moon.

August 12-13: Perseid Meteor Shower
One of the best meteor showers of the year, peaking at up to 150 meteors per hour under dark skies. The best viewing will be after midnight, but the Full Moon will wash away the faint meteors.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 2

August 14: Saturn at Opposition
Saturn will make its closest approach to Earth as it reaches its opposition on August 14. At opposition, the superior planet aligns with the Earth on the same side as shown. It’s the best time to see the planet and photograph it.

September

September 16: Neptune at Opposition
Neptune will make its closest approach to the Earth and will rise in the east around sunset.

September 22: The Autumn Equinox
Equal duration of day and night on Earth; the Sun will shine directly over the equator. It’s the first day of fall in the north and spring in the south.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 3

September 26: Jupiter at Opposition
Jupiter will align with the Earth and the Sun and lie opposite the Sun in the sky. It will be the brightest planet in the sky after Venus.

Also Read:

October

October 3: Andromeda at Culmination
It’s the best time to see the Andromeda galaxy with naked eyes under perfectly dark skies.

October 7-9: Draconid Meteor Shower
A minor meteor shower that can produce up to 10 meteors per hour in the early evening.

October 21-22: Orionid Meteor Shower
The best meteor shower of October, Orionids can produce up to 20 meteors per hour.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 4

October 30: Mars Enters Retrograde Motion
Mars will halt its usual eastward movement through the constellations and turn to move westwards.

November

November 8: Total Lunar Eclipse
2022’s last lunar eclipse, visible from Oceania, the Americas, Asia, and Northern Europe.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 5
Image: Dominic Ford, in-the-sky.org

November 8: Sun, Moon, Earth, and Uranus
The four celestial bodies will align as the Moon passes in front of Uranus on the eclipse day.

November 9: Uranus at Opposition
Uranus will make its closest approach to the Earth and will rise in the east around sunset.

November 12: Taurid Meteor Shower
Best displays just after midnight; up to 10 meteors per hour.

November 18: Leonid Meteor Shower
An average meteor shower that can produce up to 15 meteors per hour; best displays after midnight.

November 23: Jupiter Ends Retrograde Motion
Jupiter will end its westward movement through the constellations and return to its usual eastward motion.

December

December 7: Mars at Opposition
Mars will make its closest approach to Earth and shine brightly in a red hue throughout the night.

December 7: Lunar Occultation of Mars
On the day of its opposition, the Moon will pass in front of Mars, hiding it from the view. This rare astronomical event will be seen from North America, Europe, and Northern Africa. The day also marks the last Full Moon of the year, also called the Cold Moon.

Astronomy Calendar 2022: All The Exciting Celestial Events You Should Not Miss. 6
Image: Dominic Ford, in-the-sky.org

December 13-14: Geminid Meteor Shower
The best meteor shower of the year, Geminids, can produce up to 150 meteors per hour. It is also referred to as the King of Meteor Showers and produces multicolor ‘shooting stars.’ The best views will be after midnight under perfectly dark skies, away from city lights.

December 21: The Winter Solstice
The Sun will shine directly over the Tropic of Capricorn for the first time of the year. It’s the first day of winters in the north and summers in the south.

December 21-22: Ursid Meteor Shower
The last meteor shower peak of the year: up to 10 meteors per hour just after midnight.

December 31: Another revolution completed
Happy New Year!

Learn Astrophysics at Home:

Did you always want to learn how the universe works? Then, read our 30-article Basics of Astrophysics series absolutely free of cost. From the popular topics such as stars, galaxies, and black holes to the detailed concepts of the subject like the concept of magnitude, the Hertzsprung Russell diagram, redshift, etc., there is something for everyone in this series. All the articles are given here. Happy reading!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top